The art of spain!

OCD MAG are going all out for this article, we look at the heavyweights of Spain within the art industry of course!

El Greco 

The most unusual painter of the 16th century Europe, El Greco combined the strict Byzantine style of his homeland, Greece, with influences received during his studies in Venice and the medieval tradition of the country where he worked, Spain.  The fuse of the two stylistic approaches made him a widely respected artist both representing Venice and his mother land, Greece.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His Portrait of a Cardinal-border, can also be seen to have influenced Francis Bacon’s Screaming Pope, which you can see here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picasso and his blue, blue, blue period… 

Picasso’s huge and impressive career spans far than the eye can see from paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints, this guy has done the lot. Re-defining art and creating the momentum in inspiration and exploration Picasso’s artistic periods, from the early stages of  blue and rose to the great works of cubism, and neoclassicism. Here are some of the unsung or favourites of OCD MAG.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diego Velazquez

Velázquez was born in 1599 in Seville in southern Spain, at that time there was a thriving artistic community. At the age of eleven, Velázquez was apprenticed to Francisco Pacheco, Seville’s most significant artist and art theorist. One can see the significance Francisco Pacheco had on Velázquez, both through his paintings and as a mentor.

Perhaps one of the most significant achievements happened in the 17th century  which involved the ‘Siglo de Oro’ or ‘Golden Age’ for art and literature in Spain. Velázquez painted while Cervantes wrote ‘Don Quixote’ and Lope de Vega wrote his plays. The theatrical influence can be seen in his paintings, as they seem to tell a narrative, create a setting, movement within the backdrop can easily be transformed into modern times as a snapshot of everyday life, a still from a film, a memory packaged and concealed, fact or fiction…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Francisco Goya

Multifarious paintings, drawings, and engravings reflected contemporary historical upheavals and influenced important 19th- and 20th-century painters. Which is probably why his pieces are quite gruesome! From his line marking, tones and textures to the subject matter, we mean look at the devil chomping on a woman painting argh!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The man with the tash, Salvador Dali

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Intelligence without ambition is a bird without wings” Salvador Dali

But perhaps, an artist without imagination is like a well without water (ahh not too  shabby for OCD MAG to make up on the spot hey!) . The Surrealist movement has really put Dali on the map, and in return, Dali has possibly put Spain on the map for one of the most influential, respected artists of all time. Come on though, with a tash like that, how can you not dig the fella?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s jump a few years to Joan Miro shall we?

Joan Miró is well-known as one of the greatest artists of the 20th Century.  His Surrealist masterpieces hang in every major museum in the world, which is probably due to the influence of Dali. However, let’s not make Miro’s accomplishments in vain! Miro’s take on Surrealism is a lot more commercial, perhaps to reflect the modern times?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

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